gloaming

[gloh-ming]
See more synonyms for gloaming on Thesaurus.com

Origin of gloaming

before 1000; Middle English gloming, Old English glōmung, derivative of glōm twilight
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for gloaming

Contemporary Examples of gloaming

Historical Examples of gloaming

  • The goats have gathered round me as I sit musing in the gloaming.

    Mountain Meditations

    L. Lind-af-Hageby

  • It uplifted his soul, like soft music in the gloaming, or a woman's face.

    A Great Man

    Arnold Bennett

  • Man, hurry home before the gloaming betrays you to the dark.

    St. Cuthbert's

    Robert E. Knowles

  • It was in the gloaming, and the little sitting-room was warm and cosy.

  • She twisted a piece of paper into a spill, and put an end to the gloaming.

    We Two

    Edna Lyall


British Dictionary definitions for gloaming

gloaming

noun
  1. poetic twilight or dusk

Word Origin for gloaming

Old English glōmung, from glōm; related to Old Norse glāmr moon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gloaming
n.

Old English glomung "twilight," formed (probably on model of æfning "evening") from glom "twilight," related to glowan "to glow" (hence "glow of sunrise or sunset"), from Proto-Germanic *glo- (see glow (v.)). Fell from currency except in Yorkshire dialect, but preserved in Scotland and reintroduced by Burns and other Scottish writers after 1785.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper