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Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
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Idioms about here

Origin of here

First recorded before 900; Middle English; Old English hēr; cognate with German hier, Old Norse, Gothic hēr

usage note for here

10. See there.

historical usage of here

The very basic word here, a derivative of the Proto-Indo-European root ko-, ke-, kē(i)-, ki- “this, this here,” has so many relatives in so many Indo-European languages that it is hard to choose examples.
From ke-, Latin has cedo “gimme,” cēterus (from ce-eteros ) “the other, the rest of,” hic (from hic-ce ) “this, this here,” and ecce “look!” Greek has (e)keînos (from (e)ke-enos ) “that, that one (over there),” and ekeî “there, over there.” The variant ki- yields Latin cis “on this side of” (as in Gallia Cisalpina “Cisalpine Gaul,” that part of Italy in the Po Valley between the Alps and the Apennines, where Gauls lived).
In Germanic ki- becomes hi-, from which Old English has hē, his, him and the neuter pronoun hit (English he, his, him and it ), hire, the genitive and dative singular feminine pronoun (English her ), and heom, him, the dative plural of the third person pronoun, now the colloquial English ‘em. Old High German derives hiutu “this day, today” (German heute ). Hi- and the adverbial or locative suffix -r yields Gothic hēr, Old English hēr, and German hier.
Finally, Hittite has ki “this” and kinun “now.”

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH here

hear, here

Other definitions for here (2 of 2)

Here
[ heer-ee ]
/ ˈhɪər i /

noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use here in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for here (1 of 2)

here
/ (hɪə) /

adverb
noun
this placethey leave here tonight
here and now or the here and now the present time

Word Origin for here

Old English hēr; related to Old Norse hēr, Old High German hiar, Old Saxon hīr

British Dictionary definitions for here (2 of 2)

Here
/ (ˈjɪrə) /

interjection
Southern African an exclamation of surprise or dismay

Word Origin for Here

Afrikaans: Lord
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with here

here

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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