hooker

1
[ hoo k-er ]
/ ˈhʊk ər /

noun

a person or thing that hooks.
Slang. prostitute.
Slang. a large drink of liquor.
Slang. a concealed problem, flaw, or drawback; a catch.
Rugby. a player who hooks the ball in the front line of scrummage.
(initial capital letter) Offensive. a contemptuous term used to refer to an Amish Mennonite.

Nearby words

  1. hooke's law,
  2. hooke, robert,
  3. hooked,
  4. hooked rug,
  5. hookedness,
  6. hooker's green,
  7. hooker, joseph,
  8. hooker, richard,
  9. hooker, thomas,
  10. hookey

Origin of hooker

1
1560–70; 1835–45, Americanism for def 2; hook1 + -er1

Usage note

The Mennonites were irreverently spoken of as Hookers , because they used hooks and eyes on their clothes instead of buttons.

hooker

2
[ hoo k-er ]
/ ˈhʊk ər /

noun Nautical.

Slang. any old-fashioned or clumsy vessel.
any fishing vessel working with hooks and lines rather than nets.

Origin of hooker

2
1635–45; < Dutch hoeker, equivalent to hoek hook1 + -er -er1

Hooker

[ hoo k-er ]
/ ˈhʊk ər /

noun

Joseph,1814–79, Union general in the U.S. Civil War.
Richard,1554?–1600, English author and clergyman.
Thomas,1586?–1647, English Puritan clergyman: one of the founders of the colony of Connecticut.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hooker


British Dictionary definitions for hooker

hooker

1
/ (ˈhʊkə) /

noun

a commercial fishing boat using hooks and lines instead of nets
a sailing boat of the west of Ireland formerly used for cargo and now for pleasure sailing and racing

Word Origin for hooker

C17: from Dutch hoeker

noun

a person or thing that hooks
US and Canadian slang
  1. a draught of alcoholic drink, esp of spirits
  2. a prostitute
rugby the central forward in the front row of a scrum whose main job is to hook the ball

Hooker

/ (ˈhʊkə) /

noun

John Lee. 1917–2001, US blues singer and guitarist
Sir Joseph Dalton. 1817–1911, British botanist; director of Kew Gardens (1865–85)
Richard. 1554–1600, British theologian, who influenced Anglican theology with The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (1593–97)
Sir William Jackson. 1785–1865, British botanist; first director of Kew Gardens: father of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hooker

hooker

n.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper