hooray

[ hoo-rey ]
/ hʊˈreɪ /

interjection, verb (used without object), noun

Also hoo·rah [hoo-rah] /hʊˈrɑ/.

Definition for hoorah (2 of 2)

hurrah

[ huh-rah, -raw ]
/ həˈrɑ, -ˈrɔ /

interjection

(used as an exclamation of joy, exultation, appreciation, encouragement, or the like.)

verb (used without object)

to shout “hurrah.”

noun

an exclamation of “hurrah.”
hubbub; commotion; fanfare.
a colorful or tumultuous event; spectacle or celebration: We celebrated the centennial with a three-day hurrah.
Also hur·ray [huh-rey] /həˈreɪ/, hooray, hoorah.

Origin of hurrah

First recorded in 1680–90, hurrah is from the German word hurra
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hoorah

  • Now here's all this hoorah about his bein' put up for Congress!

    Heart's Desire|Emerson Hough
  • Well, if the hoorah had started there 'stead of here there'd be dead people now back of us more'n there is now.

    The Covered Wagon|Emerson Hough
  • I've taken all comers 'twixt Hoorah and Hackenny, and he ain't let me down yet.

  • "It ain't wuth a hoorah in a hen-pen if it ain't run as a tavern," stated the Cap'n.

British Dictionary definitions for hoorah (1 of 2)

hooray

/ (huːˈreɪ) /

interjection, noun, verb

a variant of hurrah

interjection

Also: hooroo (huːˈruː) Australian and NZ goodbye; cheerio

British Dictionary definitions for hoorah (2 of 2)

hurrah

hooray (huːˈreɪ) or hurray (hʊˈreɪ)

/ (hʊˈrɑː) /

interjection, noun

a cheer of joy, victory, etc

verb

to shout "hurrah"

Word Origin for hurrah

C17: probably from German hurra; compare huzzah
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012