hostile

[ hos-tl or, esp. British, -tahyl ]
/ ˈhɒs tl or, esp. British, -taɪl /

adjective

of, relating to, or characteristic of an enemy: a hostile nation.
opposed in feeling, action, or character; antagonistic: hostile criticism.
characterized by antagonism.
not friendly, warm, or generous; not hospitable.

noun

a person or thing that is antagonistic or unfriendly.
Military. an enemy soldier, plane, ship, etc.

Nearby words

  1. hostelling,
  2. hostelry,
  3. hostess,
  4. hostess gown,
  5. hostie,
  6. hostile fire,
  7. hostile sexism,
  8. hostile takeover,
  9. hostile witness,
  10. hostilely

Origin of hostile

1585–95; < Latin hostīlis, equivalent to hostis enemy (see host2) + -īlis -ile

SYNONYMS FOR hostile
1. warlike, aggressive. 2. adverse, averse, contrary. Hostile, inimical indicate that which characterizes an enemy or something injurious to one's interests. Hostile applies to the spirit, attitude, or action of an enemy: They showed a hostile and menacing attitude. Inimical applies to an antagonistic or injurious tendency or influence: Their remarks were inimical to his reputation.

Related forms
Can be confusedhostel hostile (see synonym study at the current entry)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hostile


British Dictionary definitions for hostile

hostile

/ (ˈhɒstaɪl) /

adjective

antagonistic; opposed
of or relating to an enemy
unfriendly

noun

a hostile person; enemy
Derived Formshostilely, adverb

Word Origin for hostile

C16: from Latin hostīlis, from hostis enemy

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hostile

hostile

adj.

late 15c., from Middle French hostile "of or belonging to an enemy" or directly from Latin hostilis "of an enemy," from hostis "enemy" (see guest). The noun meaning "hostile person" is recorded from 1838, American English, a word from the Indian wars.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper