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incardinate

[ in-kahr-dn-eyt ]
/ ɪnˈkɑr dnˌeɪt /
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verb (used with object), in·car·di·nat·ed, in·car·di·nat·ing.

to institute as a cardinal.
to institute as chief presbyter or priest in a particular church or place.

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Origin of incardinate

First recorded in 1600–10; from Medieval Latin incardinātus, past participle of incardināre “to appoint, to make a cardinal,” equivalent to in “in” + cardin- (stem of cardō “hinge”) + -ātus past participle suffix; see in-2, cardinal, -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM incardinate

in·car·di·na·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for incardinate

incardinate
/ (ɪnˈkɑːdɪˌneɪt) /

verb

(tr) RC Church to transfer (a cleric) to the jurisdiction of a new bishop

Word Origin for incardinate

C17: from Late Latin incardināre, from in- ² + cardinālis cardinal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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