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View synonyms for inebriate

inebriate

[ verb in-ee-bree-eyt; noun adjective in-ee-bree-it ]

verb (used with object)

, in·e·bri·at·ed, in·e·bri·at·ing.
  1. to make drunk; intoxicate.
  2. to exhilarate, confuse, or stupefy mentally or emotionally.


noun

  1. an intoxicated person.
  2. a habitual drinker of alcohol who is frequently intoxicated.

adjective

inebriate

/ ˌɪnɪˈbraɪɪtɪ /

verb

  1. to make drunk; intoxicate
  2. to arouse emotionally; make excited


noun

  1. a person who is drunk, esp habitually

adjective

  1. drunk, esp habitually
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Derived Forms

  • inebriety, noun
  • inˌebriˈation, noun
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Other Words From

  • in·e·bri·a·tion noun
  • un·in·e·bri·at·ing adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of inebriate1

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English, from Latin inēbriātus, past participle of inēbriāre “to make drunk,” equivalent to in- intensive prefix + ēbri(us) “drunk” + -ātus past participle suffix; in- 2, -ate 1
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Word History and Origins

Origin of inebriate1

C15: from Latin inēbriāre, from in- ² + ēbriāre to intoxicate, from ēbrius drunk
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Synonym Study

Inebriate and drunkard are terms for a person who drinks heavily or drinks hard liquors habitually. Drunkard is a judgmental label that connotes willful indulgence to excess. Inebriate is a formal term that sounds more factual or neutral than the stigmatizing label drunkard. Dipsomaniac is a rare, older term for a person who, because of some psychological or physiological illness, has an irresistible craving for liquor. Today, the dipsomaniac is more commonly called an alcoholic —another label that is judgmental and sometimes offensive. Rather than using either of those labels, it is more sensitive and accurate to describe such an individual as a person with alcohol use disorder, or a person who has alcoholism .
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Example Sentences

In May 2019, a video purporting to show House Speaker Nancy Pelosi inebriated, slurring her words as she gave a speech at a public event, went viral on Facebook.

From Time

Thus only can we achieve the suffusion of vision of the happy inebriate.

Never was a bird less of an inebriate, but no crumb or grain could it get except upon the invitation, "Viens, prendre ton Pernod!"

The balls would not stay on the track; the pins stood at inebriate angles.

Its garish aspect ill accorded with the patient misery, the useless repinings, the inebriate stupor which crouched beneath.

He was no inebriate, as he was stigmatized because of the unfortunate incident at his inauguration as Vice-President.

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inebriantinebriated