inebriate

[verb in-ee-bree-eyt, ih-nee-; noun, adjective in-ee-bree-it, ih-nee-]

verb (used with object), in·e·bri·at·ed, in·e·bri·at·ing.

to make drunk; intoxicate.
to exhilarate, confuse, or stupefy mentally or emotionally.

noun

an intoxicated person.
a habitual drunkard.

adjective

Also in·e·bri·at·ed. drunk; intoxicated.

Nearby words

  1. indy car racing,
  2. indy, d',
  3. ine,
  4. inearth,
  5. inebriant,
  6. inebriated,
  7. inebriation,
  8. inebriety,
  9. inedible,
  10. inedita

Origin of inebriate

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin inēbriātus past participle of inēbriāre to make drunk, equivalent to in- in-2 + ēbri(us) drunk + -ātus -ate1

Related formsin·e·bri·a·tion, nounun·in·e·bri·at·ed, adjectiveun·in·e·bri·at·ing, adjective

Synonym study

4. See drunkard.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for inebriated


British Dictionary definitions for inebriated

inebriate

verb (ɪnˈiːbrɪˌeɪt) (tr)

to make drunk; intoxicate
to arouse emotionally; make excited

noun (ɪnˈiːbrɪɪt)

a person who is drunk, esp habitually

adjective (ɪnˈiːbrɪɪt) inebriated

drunk, esp habitually
Derived Formsinebriation, nouninebriety (ˌɪnɪˈbraɪɪtɪ), noun

Word Origin for inebriate

C15: from Latin inēbriāre, from in- ² + ēbriāre to intoxicate, from ēbrius drunk

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for inebriated
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper