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inexorable

[ in-ek-ser-uh-buhl ]
/ ɪnˈɛk sər ə bəl /
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See synonyms for: inexorable / inexorability / inexorableness / inexorably on Thesaurus.com

adjective
unyielding; unalterable: inexorable truth;inexorable justice.
not to be persuaded, moved, or affected by prayers or entreaties: an inexorable creditor.
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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Origin of inexorable

From the Latin word inexōrābilis, dating back to 1545–55. See in-3, exorable

synonym study for inexorable

2. See inflexible.

OTHER WORDS FROM inexorable

in·ex·o·ra·bil·i·ty [in-ek-ser-uh-bil-i-tee], /ɪnˌɛk sər əˈbɪl ɪ ti/, in·ex·o·ra·ble·ness, nounin·ex·o·ra·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use inexorable in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for inexorable

inexorable
/ (ɪnˈɛksərəbəl) /

adjective
not able to be moved by entreaty or persuasion
relentless

Derived forms of inexorable

inexorability or inexorableness, nouninexorably, adverb

Word Origin for inexorable

C16: from Latin inexōrābilis, from in- 1 + exōrābilis, from exōrāre to prevail upon, from ōrāre to pray
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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