infant

[ in-fuh nt ]
/ ˈɪn fənt /

noun

adjective

Origin of infant

1350–1400; < Latin infant- (stem of infāns) small child, literally, one unable to speak, equivalent to in- in-3 + -fāns, present participle of fārī to speak; replacing Middle English enfaunt < Anglo-French < Latin, as above
Related formsin·fant·hood, nounin·fant·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for infant-hood

infant

/ (ˈɪnfənt) /

noun

adjective

in an early stage of development; nascentan infant science or industry
law of or relating to the legal status of infancy
Derived Formsinfanthood, noun

Word Origin for infant

C14: from Latin infāns, literally: speechless, from in- 1 + fārī to speak
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for infant-hood

infant


n.

late 14c., "child during earliest period of life" (sometimes extended to age 7 and sometimes including a fetus), from Latin infantem (nominative infans) "young child, babe in arms," noun use of adjective meaning "not able to speak," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + fans, present participle of fari "speak" (see fame (n.)). As an adjective, 1580s, from the noun.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for infant-hood

infant

[ ĭnfənt ]

n.

A child in the earliest period of life, especially before he or she can walk.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.