inform

1
[ in-fawrm ]
/ ɪnˈfɔrm /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to give information; supply knowledge or enlightenment: a magazine that entertains more than it informs.

Verb Phrases

inform on, to furnish incriminating evidence about (someone) to an authority, prosecuting officer, etc.: He informed on his accomplices.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of inform

1
1275–1325; Middle English informen < Latin infōrmāre to form, shape, equivalent to in- in-2 + fōrmāre to form; replacing Middle English enfourmen < Middle French enfourmer < Latin, as above

OTHER WORDS FROM inform

Definition for inform (2 of 2)

inform2
[ in-fawrm ]
/ ɪnˈfɔrm /

adjective Obsolete.

without form; formless.

Origin of inform

2
1545–55; < Latin informis formless, deformed, equivalent to in- in-3 + -formis -form
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for inform

British Dictionary definitions for inform (1 of 2)

inform1
/ (ɪnˈfɔːm) /

verb

Derived forms of inform

informable, adjectiveinformedly (ɪnˈfɔːmɪdlɪ), adverbinformingly, adverb

Word Origin for inform

C14: from Latin informāre to give form to, describe, from formāre to form

British Dictionary definitions for inform (2 of 2)

inform2
/ (ɪnˈfɔːm) /

adjective

archaic without shape; unformed

Word Origin for inform

C16: from Latin informis from in- 1 + forma shape
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012