inserted

[ in-sur-tid ]
/ ɪnˈsɜr tɪd /

adjective

Botany. (especially of the parts of a flower) attached to or growing out of some part.
Anatomy. having an insertion, as a muscle, tendon, or ligament; attached, as the end of a muscle that moves a bone.

Origin of inserted

First recorded in 1590–1600; insert + -ed2

Related forms

un·in·sert·ed, adjective

Definition for inserted (2 of 2)

insert

[ verb in-surt; noun in-surt ]
/ verb ɪnˈsɜrt; noun ˈɪn sɜrt /

verb (used with object)

to put or place in: to insert a key in a lock.
to introduce or cause to be introduced into the body of something: to insert an extra paragraph in an article.

noun

Origin of insert

1520–30; < Latin insertus past participle of inserere to put in, insert, equivalent to in- in-2 + ser- (stem of serere to link together) + -tus past participle suffix

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for inserted

British Dictionary definitions for inserted (1 of 2)

inserted

/ (ɪnˈsɜːtɪd) /

adjective

anatomy (of a muscle) attached to the bone that it moves
botany (of parts of a plant) growing from another part, as stamens from the corolla

British Dictionary definitions for inserted (2 of 2)

insert


verb (ɪnˈsɜːt) (tr)

to put in or between; introduce
to introduce, as into text, such as a newspaper; interpolate

noun (ˈɪnsɜːt)

something inserted
  1. a folded section placed in another for binding in with a book
  2. a printed sheet, esp one bearing advertising, placed loose between the leaves of a book, periodical, etc
another word for cut in (def. 6)

Derived Forms

insertable, adjectiveinserter, noun

Word Origin for insert

C16: from Latin inserere to plant in, ingraft, from in- ² + serere to join
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012