instal

[in-stawl]
Related formsre·in·stal, verb (used with object)

install

or in·stal

[in-stawl]
verb (used with object)
  1. to place in position or connect for service or use: to install a heating system; to install software on a computer.
  2. to establish in an office, position, or place: to install oneself in new quarters.
  3. to induct into an office or the like with ceremonies or formalities.

Origin of install

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English word from Medieval Latin word installāre. See in-2, stall1
Related formsin·stall·er, nounpre·in·stall, verb (used with object)re·in·stall, verb (used with object)
Can be confusedinstall instill

Synonyms for install

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for instal

Historical Examples of instal


British Dictionary definitions for instal

install

instal

verb -stalls, -stalling, -stalled, -stals, -stalling or -stalled (tr)
  1. to place (machinery, equipment, etc) in position and connect and adjust for use
  2. to transfer (computer software) from a distribution file to a permanent location on disk, and prepare it for its particular environment and application
  3. to put in a position, rank, etc
  4. to settle (a person, esp oneself) in a position or stateshe installed herself in an armchair
Derived Formsinstaller, noun

Word Origin for install

C16: from Medieval Latin installāre, from in- ² + stallum stall 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for instal

install

v.

early 15c., "place in (ecclesiastical) office by seating in an official stall," from Medieval Latin installare, from Latin in- "in" (see in- (2)) + Medieval Latin stallum "stall," from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German stal "standing place;" see stall (n.1)). Related: Installed; installing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper