involution

[ in-vuh-loo-shuhn ]
/ ˌɪn vəˈlu ʃən /

noun

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Origin of involution

First recorded in 1605–15, involution is from the Medieval Latin word involūtiōn- (stem of involūtiō). See involute, -ion

OTHER WORDS FROM involution

su·per·in·vo·lu·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for involution

British Dictionary definitions for involution

involution
/ (ˌɪnvəˈluːʃən) /

noun

Derived forms of involution

involutional, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for involution

involution
[ ĭn′və-lōōshən ]

n.

A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.catagenesis

Other words from involution

in′vo•lution•al adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for involution

involution
[ ĭn′və-lōōshən ]

A mathematical operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.