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iodine

[ ahy-uh-dahyn, -din; in Chemistry also ahy-uh-deen ]

noun

, Chemistry.
  1. a nonmetallic halogen element occurring at ordinary temperatures as a grayish-black crystalline solid that sublimes to a dense violet vapor when heated: used in medicine as an antiseptic. : I; : 126.904; : 53; : (solid) 4.93 at 20°C.


iodine

/ ˈaɪəˌdiːn /

noun

  1. a bluish-black element of the halogen group that sublimates into a violet irritating gas. Its compounds are used in medicine and photography and in dyes. The radioisotope iodine-131 ( radioiodine ), with a half-life of 8 days, is used in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease. Symbol: I; atomic no: 53; atomic wt: 126.90447; valency: 1, 3, 5, or 7; relative density: 4.93; melting pt: 113.5°C; boiling pt: 184.35°C


iodine

/ īə-dīn′ /

  1. A shiny, grayish-black element of the halogen group. It is corrosive and poisonous and occurs in very small amounts in nature except for seaweed, in which it is abundant. Iodine compounds are used in medicine, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53; atomic weight 126.9045; melting point 113.5°C; boiling point 184.35°C; specific gravity (solid, at 20°C) 4.93; valence 1, 3, 5, 7.


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Word History and Origins

Origin of iodine1

First recorded in 1814; from French iode + -ine 2( def 2 ); introduced by H. Davy. Ultimately from Greek īṓdēs, originally “rust-colored”, but by folk etymology taken as í(on) “violet” + -ōdēs noun suffix; -ode 1( def )
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Word History and Origins

Origin of iodine1

C19: from French iode, from Greek iōdēs rust-coloured, but taken to mean violet-coloured, through a mistaken derivation from ion violet
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Compare Meanings

How does iodine compare to similar and commonly confused words? Explore the most common comparisons:

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Example Sentences

In fact, the iodine was such an effective nucleator that the researchers had a difficult time scrubbing it away from the sides of the chamber for subsequent experiments, which required a completely clean environment.

Walnut trees have a small amount of iodine in the nuts and in their sap.

Salt enhanced with iodine is often our primary source of this essential nutrient.

After reconstructing the supply chain that way, he tracked down the country’s salt producers to talk to them about iodine.

It became a secondary priority because of the push with iodine.

The website even sells iodine drops, called “Survival Shield,” at their official store.

The sun was strangely warm on my wrists, or perhaps they were tingling from the potassium iodine.

They said this phenomenon might have caused the level of iodine to rise before the tap water could reach the purifying plant.

At Chernobyl, iodine fell on the grass, cows ate the grass, and people drank the milk.

Brenner said that distributing iodine in Japan is prudent, but probably unecessary.

This I attribute to the potash being in a little more caustic condition than when recrystallised with iodine.

Of the other substances, iodine is restricted exclusively to sea-plants, but to them it appears to be essential.

The calculation may be made exactly as in the case of the similar constant for iodine (p. 273).

The tendency of iodine to form hypoiodous acid, iodates, etc., is not taken into consideration here and involves another relation.

"Yes, 'tis his left hand he'd be using all the time when I'm not noticing him," said Kate, returning with the iodine.

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iodinateiodine 131