jig

1
[ jig ]
/ dʒɪg /

noun

verb (used with object), jigged, jig·ging.

to treat, cut, produce, etc., with a jig.

verb (used without object), jigged, jig·ging.

to use a jig.
to fish with a jig.

QUIZZES

THINK YOU’VE GOT A HANDLE ON THIS US STATE NICKNAME QUIZ?

Did you ever collect all those state quarters? Put them to good use on this quiz about curious state monikers and the facts around them.
Question 1 of 8
Mississippi’s nickname comes from the magnificent trees that grow there. What is it?

Origin of jig

1
First recorded in 1855–60; probably akin to jig2, in the sense “jerk to and fro”; origin and interrelationship of these words uncertain

Definition for jig (2 of 4)

jig2
[ jig ]
/ dʒɪg /

noun

verb (used with object), jigged, jig·ging.

verb (used without object), jigged, jig·ging.

to dance or play a jig.
to move with a quick, jerky motion; hop; bob.

Origin of jig

2
1550–60; in earliest sense “kind of dance” perhaps <Middle French giguer to frolic, gambol, probably < an unattested WGmc verb (cf. gig1); semantic development of other senses unclear

OTHER WORDS FROM jig

jiglike, jiggish, adjective

Definition for jig (3 of 4)

jig3
[ jig ]
/ dʒɪg /

noun

(formerly used in communications to represent the letter J.)

Definition for jig (4 of 4)

jig4
[ jig ]
/ dʒɪg /

noun Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive.

a contemptuous term used to refer to a Black person.

Origin of jig

4
1920–25, Americanism; of uncertain origin; cf. jigaboo
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for jig

  • "Divil a-man in the five parishes can dance 'Jig Polthogue' wid him, for all that," said Barny.

  • A notable 'jig' was that called 'Schanke's Ordinary,' in which several performers took part.

    South London|Sir Walter Besant
  • "I don't know how to 'jig,' but it's delightful to look on," she answered merrily.

    What Katy Did Next|Susan Coolidge

British Dictionary definitions for jig

jig
/ (dʒɪɡ) /

noun

verb jigs, jigging or jigged

Word Origin for jig

C16 (originally: a dance or the music for it; applied to various modern devices because of the verbal sense: to jerk up and down rapidly): of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012