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judiciary

[ joo-dish-ee-er-ee, -dish-uh-ree ]
/ dʒuˈdɪʃ iˌɛr i, -ˈdɪʃ ə ri /
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noun, plural ju·di·ci·ar·ies.
the judicial branch of government.
the system of courts of justice in a country.
judges collectively.
adjective
pertaining to the judicial branch or system or to judges.
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Origin of judiciary

First recorded in 1580–90; originally an adjective, from Latin jūdiciārius “of the law courts,” equivalent to jūdici(um) “judgment” + -ārius adjective suffix; see judge, -ary

OTHER WORDS FROM judiciary

ju·di·ci·ar·i·ly, adverbsub·ju·di·ci·ar·y, adjective, noun, plural sub·ju·di·ci·ar·ies.

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH judiciary

judicial, judiciary , judicious
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use judiciary in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for judiciary

judiciary
/ (dʒuːˈdɪʃɪərɪ, -ˈdɪʃərɪ) /

adjective
of or relating to courts of law, judgment, or judges
noun plural -aries
the branch of the central authority in a state concerned with the administration of justiceCompare executive (def. 2), legislature
the system of courts in a country
the judges collectively; bench
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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