justice

[ juhs-tis ]
/ ˈdʒʌs tɪs /

noun


Nearby words

  1. just the ticket,
  2. just what the doctor ordered,
  3. just-in-time,
  4. justaucorps,
  5. juste-milieu,
  6. justice court,
  7. justice in eyre,
  8. justice of the peace,
  9. justice of the peace court,
  10. justice's court

Idioms

    bring to justice, to cause to come before a court for trial or to receive punishment for one's misdeeds: The murderer was brought to justice.
    do justice,
    1. to act or treat justly or fairly.
    2. to appreciate properly: We must see this play again to do it justice.
    3. to acquit in accordance with one's abilities or potentialities: He finally got a role in which he could do himself justice as an actor.

Origin of justice

1150–1200; Middle English < Old French < Latin jūstitia, equivalent to jūst(us) just1 + -itia -ice

Related formsjus·tice·less, adjective

Can be confusedjudge justice (see synonym study at judge)

Justice

[ juhs-tis ]
/ ˈdʒʌs tɪs /

noun

Donald,1925–2004, U.S. poet.
a town in NE Illinois.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for justice


British Dictionary definitions for justice

justice

/ (ˈdʒʌstɪs) /

noun

Word Origin for justice

C12: from Old French, from Latin jūstitia, from justus just

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for justice

justice

n.

mid-12c., "the exercise of authority in vindication of right by assigning reward or punishment;" also "quality of being fair and just," from Old French justice "justice, legal rights, jurisdiction" (11c.), from Latin iustitia "righteousness, equity," from iustus "upright, just" (see just (adj.)). The Old French word had widespread senses, including "uprightness, equity, vindication of right, court of justice, judge." The word began to be used in English c.1200 as a title for a judicial officer. Meaning "right order, equity" is late 14c. Justice of the peace first attested early 14c. In the Mercian hymns, Latin iustitia is glossed by Old English rehtwisnisse. To do justice to (someone or something) "render fully and fairly showing due appreciation" is from 1670s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Culture definitions for justice

Justice

A figure in painting and sculpture that symbolizes the impartiality of true justice. The figure of Justice usually appears as a blindfolded woman with a scale in one hand and a sword in the other.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with justice

justice

see do justice to; miscarriage of justice; poetic justice.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.