justify

[ juhs-tuh-fahy ]
/ ˈdʒʌs təˌfaɪ /

verb (used with object), jus·ti·fied, jus·ti·fy·ing.

to show (an act, claim, statement, etc.) to be just or right: The end does not always justify the means.
to defend or uphold as warranted or well-grounded: Don't try to justify his rudeness.
Theology. to declare innocent or guiltless; absolve; acquit.
Printing.
  1. to make (a line of type) a desired length by spacing the words and letters, especially so that full lines in a column have even margins both on the left and on the right.
  2. to level and square (a strike).

verb (used without object), jus·ti·fied, jus·ti·fy·ing.

Law.
  1. to show a satisfactory reason or excuse for something done.
  2. to qualify as bail or surety.
Printing. (of a line of type) to fit exactly into a desired length.

Origin of justify

1250–1300; Middle English justifien < Old French justifier < Late Latin jūstificāre, equivalent to Latin jūsti- (combining form of jūstus just1) + -ficāre -fy

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for justify

British Dictionary definitions for justify

justify

/ (ˈdʒʌstɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (mainly tr)

Derived Forms

justifier, noun

Word Origin for justify

C14: from Old French justifier, from Latin justificāre, from jūstus just + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012