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Kelvin

[ kel-vin ]

noun

  1. William Thomson, 1st Baron, 1824–1907, English physicist and mathematician.
  2. (lowercase) the basic unit of temperature in the International System of Units (SI), formally defined to be approximately 1/273 of the triple point of water. : K


adjective

  1. Thermodynamics. noting or pertaining to an absolute scale of temperature Kelvin scale in which the degree intervals are equal to those of the Celsius scale and in which absolute zero is 0 degrees Kelvin and the triple point of water has the value of approximately 273 degrees Kelvin. Compare absolute temperature scale, Celsius ( def 3 ).
  2. Also Kel·win [] a male given name.

Kelvin

1

/ ˈkɛlvɪn /

noun

  1. KelvinWilliam Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin18241907MBritishSCIENCE: physicist William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin. 1824–1907, British physicist, noted for his work in thermodynamics, inventing the Kelvin scale, and in electricity, pioneering undersea telegraphy


kelvin

2

/ ˈkɛlvɪn /

noun

  1. the basic SI unit of thermodynamic temperature; the fraction 1 273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water K

kelvin

1

/ kĕlvĭn /

  1. The SI unit used to measure temperature, the basic unit of the Kelvin scale. A difference of one degree Kelvin corresponds to the same temperature difference as a difference of one degree Celsius.
  2. See Table at measurementSee also absolute zero


Kelvin

2
  1. British mathematician and physicist known especially for his work on heat and electricity. In 1848 he proposed a scale of temperature independent of any physical substance, which became known as the Kelvin scale.
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Example Sentences

In a lab setting, Kelvin says, this process would take about a month from start to finish.

“Every single thing that you’re putting into it needs to have that certification that this is GMP produced,” Kelvin says.

Kelvin was hired as a director with Laborers Local 89, where he works on political and policy issues at all levels of government.

Therefore, I’m pausing my involvement in Kelvin’s campaign until the DA’s review is completed.

What I’m learning now is concerning, and I’m not going to disregard it simply because Kelvin worked for me in the past and I endorsed his campaign.

The editor who took the Sun to the heights of its formula was Kelvin McKenzie, who ran it from 1981 to 1994.

I asked Kelvin what else he remembered about this place and the rectangles.

Kelvin remembered wrapping mackerel in them and eating them wild with seasoning.

One Kelvin standard compass, with azimuth mirror on compass platform.

Leslie had learned that the Kelvin family amused itself in this fashion every night when the fishing was not particularly good.

A half-degree sun doesn't radiate heat enough to keep a ship warm, when the rest of the cosmos is effectively near zero Kelvin.

Next should be mentioned the line of profound observers, from Galileo and Torricelli to Kelvin.

Such ideas were advocated by Richter in a rather phantastic way and more definitely by Helmholtz as well as Kelvin.

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kelterKelvin, Lord