laud

[ lawd ]
/ lɔd /

verb (used with object)

to praise; extol.

noun

a song or hymn of praise.
lauds, (used with a singular or plural verb)Ecclesiastical. a canonical hour, marked especially by psalms of praise, usually recited with matins.

QUIZZES

BECOME A PRO CHEF WITH THIS EXQUISITE CUISINE QUIZ!

Even if you can't be a professional chef, you can at least talk like one with this vocabulary quiz.
Question 1 of 9
You may have read the word "simmer" in a recipe or two, but what does it really mean?

Origin of laud

1300–50; (v.) Middle English lauden<Latin laudāre to praise, derivative of laus (stem laud-) praise; (noun) Middle English laude, back formation from laudes (plural) <Late Latin, special use of plural of Latin laus praise

SYNONYMS FOR laud

ANTONYMS FOR laud

OTHER WORDS FROM laud

lauder, lau·da·tor [law-dey-ter], /ˈlɔ deɪ tər/, nouno·ver·laud, verb (used with object)un·laud·ed, adjective

Definition for laud (2 of 2)

Laud
[ lawd ]
/ lɔd /

noun

William, 1573–1645, archbishop of Canterbury and opponent of Puritanism: executed for treason.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for laud

British Dictionary definitions for laud (1 of 2)

laud
/ (lɔːd) literary /

verb

(tr) to praise or glorify

noun

praise or glorification

Derived forms of laud

lauder, noun

Word Origin for laud

C14: vb from Latin laudāre; n from laudēs, pl of Latin laus praise

British Dictionary definitions for laud (2 of 2)

Laud
/ (lɔːd) /

noun

William. 1573–1645, English prelate; archbishop of Canterbury (1633–45). His persecution of Puritans and his High Church policies in England and Scotland were a cause of the Civil War; he was impeached by the Long Parliament (1640) and executed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012