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liquorice

[ lik-uh-rish, lik-rish, lik-er-is ]

noun

, Chiefly British.
  1. a variant of licorice.


liquorice

/ -ərɪʃ; ˈlɪkərɪs /

noun

  1. a perennial Mediterranean leguminous shrub, Glycyrrhiza glabra, having spikes of pale blue flowers and flat red-brown pods
  2. the dried root of this plant, used as a laxative and in confectionery
  3. a sweet having a liquorice flavour


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Word History and Origins

Origin of liquorice1

C13: via Anglo-Norman and Old French from Late Latin liquirītia, from Latin glycyrrhīza, from Greek glukurrhiza, from glukus sweet + rhiza root
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Example Sentences

Icelanders, for example, have over two-dozen kinds of chocolate-covered liquorice, and the Japanese love their Cream Collon.

One branch of the local export trade to which we may refer is that in liquorice, a plant that grows wild freely on the plain.

Honey and a strong infusion of liquorice boiled to a proper consistence.

For internal use, an equal weight of liquorice root (sliced) is commonly added.

Hufeland recommends the addition of a little liquorice root.

Make a strong tea of everlasting—strain, and put to a quart of it two ounces of figs or raisins, two of liquorice, cut in bits.

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liquorliquorice allsorts