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View synonyms for locust

locust

[ loh-kuhst ]

noun

  1. Also called acridid, short-horned grasshopper. any of several grasshoppers of the family Acrididae, having short antennae and commonly migrating in swarms that strip the vegetation from large areas.
  2. any of various cicadas, as the seventeen-year locust.
  3. any of several North American trees belonging to the genus Robinia, of the legume family, especially R. pseudoacacia, having pinnate leaves and clusters of fragrant white flowers.
  4. the durable wood of this tree.
  5. any of various other trees, as the carob and the honey locust.


locust

/ ˈləʊkəst /

noun

  1. any of numerous orthopterous insects of the genera Locusta, Melanoplus, etc, such as L. migratoria, of warm and tropical regions of the Old World, which travel in vast swarms, stripping large areas of vegetation See also grasshopper Compare seventeen-year locust
  2. Also calledlocust treefalse acacia a North American leguminous tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, having prickly branches, hanging clusters of white fragrant flowers, and reddish-brown seed pods
  3. the yellowish durable wood of this tree
  4. any of several similar trees, such as the honey locust and carob


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Derived Forms

  • ˈlocust-ˌlike, adjective

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Other Words From

  • locust·like adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of locust1

1150–1200; Middle English < Latin locusta grasshopper

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Word History and Origins

Origin of locust1

C13 (the insect): from Latin locusta locust; applied to the tree (C17) because the pods resemble locusts

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Example Sentences

Scientists weren’t sure what coaxed solitary migratory locusts of another species, Locusta migratoria, to congregate.

When solitary locusts get together, they do more than hang out.

They started by identifying chemicals that gregarious locusts pump out.

Traps laced with 4VA could concentrate locusts and make treatment with insecticides or pathogens much easier, especially if 4VA acts as an attractant in other species as well, like the desert locust.

It proved alluring to locusts of all sexes and ages, including both solitary and gregarious forms.

This spring, Israel found itself in the midst of a locust invasion.

I long for the day I no longer have to think about this pestilential little locust.

In refurbishing the park, the designers added 54 honey locust trees and one larger London Plane at the northeastern corner.

"No wonder things git pindlin' under this old locust-tree," Sophy heard him grumble.

Something sang in the sunny air above my head, and I flicked with my whip to drive the locust away.

Oak and walnut trees abound upon this creek, besides elm, ash, and locust.

It bears a pod similar to that of the locust, to which it is related, containing eight to twelve beans.

Say, that's why they call a policeman's club his locust, ain't it?

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locus standilocust bean