Lucretia

[loo-kree-shuh, -shee-uh]
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noun

Also Lu·crece [loo-krees] /luˈkris/. Roman Legend. a Roman woman whose suicide led to the expulsion of the Tarquins and the establishment of the Roman republic.
a female given name.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for lucretia

Historical Examples of lucretia

  • Miss Lucretia was always delighted to see her sister, and made the most of her rather infrequent visits.

  • Lucretia says he returned within a quarter of an hour and tried my door.

  • Lucretia remained for some time in meditation; then she wrote a few lines, which she despatched at once to Mr. Rigby.

    Coningsby

    Benjamin Disraeli

  • Could Lucretia ever forgive the injury, and could she fail to detect the hand that inflicted it?

    Lucretia, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton

  • Grasping the arms of her chair with both hands, her eyes fixed eagerly on his face, Lucretia Dalibard awaited the welcome visitor.

    Lucretia, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton



British Dictionary definitions for lucretia

Lucretia

noun

(in Roman legend) a Roman woman who killed herself after being raped by a son of Tarquin the Proud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lucretia

Lucretia

fem. proper name, from Latin Lucretia (cf. French Lucrèce), fem. of Lucretius, Roman masc. proper name, originally the name of a Roman gens.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper