maddening

[mad-n-ing]
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adjective
  1. driving to madness or frenzy: a maddening thirst.
  2. infuriating or exasperating: his maddening indifference to my pleas.
  3. raging; furious: a maddening wind.

Origin of maddening

First recorded in 1735–45; madden + -ing2
Related formsmad·den·ing·ly, adverbmad·den·ing·ness, noun

madden

[mad-n]
verb (used with object)
  1. to anger or infuriate: The delays maddened her.
  2. to make insane.
verb (used without object)
  1. to become mad; act as if mad; rage.

Origin of madden

First recorded in 1725–35; mad + -en1
Related formsun·mad·dened, adjective

Synonyms for madden

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Antonyms for madden

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for maddening

Contemporary Examples of maddening

Historical Examples of maddening

  • The maddening interview of this one night has filled my soul with love—but not for thee.

    The Lamplighter

    Charles Dickens

  • This maddening impatience told on my strength, which was small, and hindered me.

    Green Mansions

    W. H. Hudson

  • We passed four men, and their greeting was maddening in its jeer.

    The Law-Breakers

    Ridgwell Cullum

  • Which would be maddening for someone with no work to do or no resources in himself, or herself.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • Then the maddening cries of the prisoners whose relatives had not come.

    The Scapegoat

    Hall Caine


British Dictionary definitions for maddening

maddening

adjective
  1. serving to send mad
  2. extremely annoying; exasperating
Derived Formsmaddeningly, adverbmaddeningness, noun

madden

verb
  1. to make or become mad or angry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for maddening
adj.

1743, from present participle of madden. Related: Maddeningly.

madden

v.

"to drive to distraction," 1822; earlier "to be mad" (1735), from mad (adj.) + -en (1). Related: Maddened; maddening. The earlier verb was simply mad (early 14c., intransitive; late 14c., transitive), from the adjective.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper