Dictionary.com

mandolin

[ man-dl-in, man-dl-in ]
/ ˈmæn dl ɪn, ˌmæn dlˈɪn /
Save This Word!

noun

a musical instrument with a pear-shaped wooden body and a fretted neck.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!

Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Meet Grammar Coach

Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing

Meet Grammar Coach

Improve Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of mandolin

1700–10; <Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola, variant of mandora, alteration of pandorabandore

OTHER WORDS FROM mandolin

man·do·lin·ist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for mandolin

British Dictionary definitions for mandolin

mandolin

mandoline

/ (ˌmændəˈlɪn) /

noun

a plucked stringed instrument related to the lute, having four pairs of strings tuned in ascending fifths stretched over a small light body with a fretted fingerboard. It is usually played with a plectrum, long notes being sustained by the tremolo
a vegetable slicer consisting of a flat stainless-steel frame with adjustable cutting blades

Derived forms of mandolin

mandolinist, noun

Word Origin for mandolin

C18: via French from Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandora lute, ultimately from Greek pandoura musical instrument with three strings
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK