maroon

1
[muh-roon]
See more synonyms for maroon on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. dark brownish-red.
  2. Chiefly British.
    1. a loudly exploding firework consisting of a cardboard container filled with gunpowder.
    2. a similar firework used as a danger or warning signal, as by railway brakemen.

Origin of maroon

1
1585–95; < French marron literally, chestnut, Middle French < Upper Italian (Tuscan marrone), perhaps ultimately derivative of pre-Latin *marr- stone

maroon

2
[muh-roon]
verb (used with object)
  1. to put ashore and abandon on a desolate island or coast by way of punishment or the like, as was done by buccaneers.
  2. to place in an isolated and often dangerous position: The rising floodwaters marooned us on top of the house.
  3. to abandon and leave without aid or resources: Having lost all his money, he was marooned in the strange city.
noun
  1. (often initial capital letter) any of a group of blacks, descended from fugitive slaves of the 17th and 18th centuries, living in the West Indies and Guiana, especially in mountainous areas.
  2. a person who is marooned: Robinson Crusoe lived for years as a maroon.

Origin of maroon

2
1660–70; < French mar(r)on, apparently < American Spanish cimarrón wild (see cimarron); first used in reference to domestic animals that escaped into the woods, later to fugitive slaves
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for maroon

isolate, strand, leave, beach, desert, forsake

Examples from the Web for maroon

Contemporary Examples of maroon

  • We all remember when Levine shot to fame with Maroon 5's Songs About Jane.

  • It stayed at the top for three days, out-pacing tracks by Maroon 5, Kendrick Lamar, and 50 Cent.

    The Daily Beast logo
    When Harry Met Cancer

    Itay Hod

    April 10, 2014

  • Halle Berry won the same award in 2002 for Monster's Ball when she dazzled in a semi-sheer, maroon Elie Saab gown.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Barbara Tfank: The Red Carpet Radical

    Erin Cunningham

    March 2, 2014

  • The color scheme remained neutral and muted, mainly black and white with hints of pink or maroon popping out occassionally.

    The Daily Beast logo
    At Victoria Beckham, Boy Meets Girl

    Erin Cunningham

    September 8, 2013

  • As I entered the one-room building, I saw some 20 people standing in the back, mostly prison officials in maroon jackets.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Eyewitness to the Firing Squad

    Lawrence Schiller

    April 25, 2010

Historical Examples of maroon

  • Then said Captain Maroon, 'Now, how much time do you want to make the other twenty in?

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens

  • Finally said Captain Maroon, when that wouldn't suit either, 'Hand over, then!'

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens

  • He had no doubt but that the maroon had a message for him from his master.

    Sir Henry Morgan, Buccaneer

    Cyrus Townsend Brady

  • But before the maroon could obey they heard steps on the porch.

    Sir Henry Morgan, Buccaneer

    Cyrus Townsend Brady

  • "You must maroon me as soon as ever you can get amongst these islands off the Cambodge shore," he went on.

    The Secret Sharer

    Joseph Conrad


British Dictionary definitions for maroon

maroon

1
verb (tr)
  1. to leave ashore and abandon, esp on an island
  2. to isolate without resources
noun
  1. a descendant of a group of runaway slaves living in the remoter areas of the Caribbean or Guyana
  2. US and Canadian informal a person who has been marooned, esp on an island

Word Origin for maroon

C17 (applied to fugitive slaves): from American Spanish cimarrón wild, literally: dwelling on peaks, from Spanish cima summit

maroon

2
noun
    1. a dark red to purplish-red colour
    2. (as adjective)a maroon carpet
  1. an exploding firework, esp one used as a warning signal

Word Origin for maroon

C18: from French, literally: chestnut, marron 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for maroon
n.

"very dark reddish-brown color," 1791, from French couleur marron, the color of a marron "chestnut," the large sweet chestnut of southern Europe (maroon in that sense was used in English from 1590s), from dialect of Lyons, ultimately from a word in a pre-Roman language, perhaps Ligurian; or from Greek maraon "sweet chestnut."

v.

"put ashore on a desolate island or coast," 1724 (implied in marooning), earlier "to be lost in the wild" (1690s); from maron (n.) "fugitive black slave in the jungles of W.Indies and Dutch Guyana" (1660s), earlier symeron (1620s), from French marron, said to be a corruption of Spanish cimmaron "wild, untamed," from Old Spanish cimarra "thicket," probably from cima "summit, top" (from Latin cyma "sprout"), with a notion of living wild in the mountains. Related: Marooned.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper