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cimarron

[ sim-uh-ron, -rohn, -er-uhn; sim-uh-rohn ]
/ ˈsɪm əˌrɒn, -ˌroʊn, -ər ən; ˌsɪm əˈroʊn /
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noun
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Origin of cimarron

First recorded in 1840–50; from Colonial Spanish (carnero) cimarrón “wild (ram),” Spanish: “wild,” probably equivalent to Old Spanish cimarra “brushwood, thicket,” from cim(a) “peak, summit” (from Latin cȳma “spring shoots of a vegetable,” from Greek; see cyme) + -arrón adjective suffix; cf. maroon2

Other definitions for cimarron (2 of 2)

Cimarron
[ sim-uh-ron, -rohn, -er-uhn; sim-uh-rohn ]
/ ˈsɪm əˌrɒn, -ˌroʊn, -ər ən; ˌsɪm əˈroʊn /

noun
a river flowing E from NE New Mexico to the Arkansas River in Oklahoma. 600 miles (965 km) long.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use cimarron in a sentence

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