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mechanize

[mek-uh-nahyz]
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verb (used with object), mech·a·nized, mech·a·niz·ing.
  1. to make mechanical.
  2. to operate or perform by or as if by machinery.
  3. to introduce machinery into (an industry, enterprise, etc.), especially in order to replace manual labor.
  4. Military. to equip with tanks and other armored vehicles.
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Also especially British, mech·a·nise.

Origin of mechanize

First recorded in 1695–1705; mechan(ic) + -ize
Related formsmech·a·ni·za·tion, nounmech·a·niz·er, nounan·ti·mech·a·ni·za·tion, adjectiveun·mech·a·nized, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for mechanization

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Don't you see that you can't cure human problems by mechanization?

    Watchbird

    Robert Sheckley

  • The mechanization of economics had become a common possession for everybody.

    The New Society

    Walther Rathenau

  • Work was being done by a puzzling combination of mechanization and musclepower.

    The Syndic

    C.M. Kornbluth

  • But mechanization is not of necessity all there is to habit.

  • Mechanization most drastically altered life on the family farm.

    Frying Pan Farm

    Elizabeth Brown Pryor


British Dictionary definitions for mechanization

mechanize

mechanise

verb (tr)
  1. to equip (a factory, industry, etc) with machinery
  2. to make mechanical, automatic, or monotonous
  3. to equip (an army, etc) with motorized or armoured vehicles
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Derived Formsmechanization or mechanisation, nounmechanizer or mechaniser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for mechanization

n.

1834, from mechanize + -ation.

In our country, the ancient languages are studied, to a sad extent, as a mere exercise in the technics of etymology, syntax and prosody; and when thus pursued, there can be no good reason for so great a sacrifice of time and labor, or for that mechanization (if we may make a term) of mind which is the natural result. ["American Annals of Education and Instruction," December 1834]
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mechanize

v.

1670s; see mechanic (adj.) + -ize. Related: Mechanized; mechanizing.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper