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View synonyms for mere

mere

1

[ meer ]

adjective

, superlative mer·est.
  1. being nothing more nor better than:

    a mere pittance;

    He is still a mere child.

  2. Obsolete.
    1. pure and unmixed, as wine, a people, or a language.
    2. fully as much as what is specified; completely fulfilled or developed; absolute.


mere

2

[ meer ]

noun

  1. Chiefly British Dialect. a lake or pond.
  2. Obsolete. any body of sea water.

mere

3
or mear

[ meer ]

noun

, British Dialect.
  1. a boundary or boundary marker.

mère

4

[ mer; English mair ]

noun

, French.
, plural mères [me, r, mairz].

-mere

5
  1. a combining form meaning “part,” used in the formation of compound words:

    blastomere.

mere

1

/ ˈmɛrɪ /

noun

  1. a short flat striking weapon


mere

2

/ mɪə /

adjective

  1. being nothing more than something specified

    she is a mere child

-mere

3

combining form

  1. indicating a part or division

    blastomere

mere

4

/ mɪə /

noun

  1. archaic.
    a boundary or boundary marker

mere

5

/ mɪə /

noun

  1. archaic.
    a lake or marsh
  2. obsolete.
    the sea or an inlet of it

–mere

  1. A suffix meaning “part” or “segment,” as in blastomere, one of the cells that form a blastula.


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Derived Forms

  • -meric, combining_form:in_adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of mere1

First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English mer(e) “pure, clear, unmixed,” from Old French mier, mer, from Latin merus “pure, unmixed, simple, mere”

Origin of mere2

First recorded before 900; Middle English mere, mer, meire, Old English mer, mære “sea, ocean, lake, pond, well, cistern,” cognate with German Meer, Old Norse marr, Gothic marei, Old Irish muir, Latin mare

Origin of mere3

First recorded before 900; Middle English mere, mer, merre, Old English mǣre, gemǣre; cognate with Old Norse mæri “boundary, border land”; akin to Latin mūrus “defensive wall, city wall, boundary wall”

Origin of mere4

Combining form representing Greek méros

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Word History and Origins

Origin of mere1

Māori

Origin of mere2

C15: from Latin merus pure, unmixed

Origin of mere3

from Greek meros part, portion

Origin of mere4

Old English gemǣre

Origin of mere5

Old English mere sea, lake; related to Old Saxon meri sea, Old Norse marr, Old High German mari; compare Latin mare

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Synonym Study

Mere, bare imply a scant sufficiency. They are often interchangeable, but mere frequently means no more than (enough). Bare suggests scarcely as much as (enough). Thus a mere livelihood means enough to live on but no more; a bare livelihood means scarcely enough to live on.

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Example Sentences

While actual life on Pluto is highly unlikely, the mere presence of the ingredients for life is quite remarkable.

Taste buds can turn food from mere fuel into a memorable meal.

Some of the disclosure documents the sellers turned over were based on mere visual inspections of the site.

Thompson said the high-rise would only need a $10,000 power wash, a claim that came from a mere visual inspection of the site and offered by one of the sellers.

The description came directly from one of the seller’s reports, which was based on a mere visual inspection of the site.

These matters are not mere threats to abstract constitutional principles.

Her Miss America win transcended mere superficial beauty standards.

Scalise spoke about taxes and government slush funds for a mere 15 minutes, Knight said.

Business questions are raised—who starts a PE firm and bails on it in a matter of mere months?

Human vision is as close as we mere mortals will ever come to having a genuine superpower.

All elements of expression modify each other, so that no mere rule can cover all cases.

All my musical studies till now have been a mere going to school, a preparation for him.

And is this a mere fantastic talk, or is this a thing that could be done and that ought to be done?

He said no more in words, but his little blue eyes had an eloquence that left nothing to mere speech.

The real experience has a magnetism of its own and will win above mere technicality whenever it has the opportunity.

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