minute

1
[min-it]
noun
  1. the sixtieth part (1/60) of an hour; sixty seconds.
  2. an indefinitely short space of time: Wait a minute!
  3. an exact point in time; instant; moment: Come here this minute!
  4. minutes, the official record of the proceedings at a meeting of a society, committee, or other group.
  5. Chiefly British. a written summary, note, or memorandum.
  6. a rough draft, as of a document.
  7. Geometry. the sixtieth part of a degree of angular measure, often represented by the sign ′, as in 12° 10′, which is read as 12 degrees and 10 minutes.Compare angle1(def 1c).
verb (used with object), min·ut·ed, min·ut·ing.
  1. to time exactly, as movements or speed.
  2. to make a draft of (a document or the like).
  3. to record in a memorandum; note down.
  4. to enter in the minutes of a meeting.
adjective
  1. prepared in a very short time: minute pudding.
Idioms
  1. up to the minute, modern; up-to-date: The building design is up to the minute.

Origin of minute

1
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin minūta, noun use of feminine of minūtus minute2
Related formsun·min·ut·ed, adjective

Synonyms for minute

2. jiffy, second. Minute, instant, moment refer to small amounts of time. A minute, properly denoting 60 seconds, is often used loosely for any very short space of time (and may be interchangeable with second ): I'll be there in just a minute. An instant is practically a point in time, with no duration, though it is also used to mean a perceptible amount of time: not an instant's delay. Moment denotes much the same as instant, though with a somewhat greater sense of duration (but somewhat less than minute ): It will only take a moment.

minute

2
[mahy-noot, -nyoot, mi-]
adjective, mi·nut·er, mi·nut·est.
  1. extremely small, as in size, amount, extent, or degree: minute differences.
  2. of minor importance; insignificant; trifling.
  3. attentive to or concerned with even the smallest details: a minute examination.

Origin of minute

2
1425–75; late Middle English < Latin minūtus (past participle of minuere to make smaller or fewer), equivalent to minū- verb stem + -tus past participle suffix. See minus, minor
Related formsmi·nute·ness, noun

Synonyms for minute

1. tiny, infinitesimal, minuscule. See little. 3. detailed, exact, precise.

Antonyms for minute

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for minuter

Historical Examples of minuter


British Dictionary definitions for minuter

minute

1
noun
  1. a period of time equal to 60 seconds; one sixtieth of an hour
  2. Also called: minute of arc a unit of angular measure equal to one sixtieth of a degreeSymbol:
  3. any very short period of time; moment
  4. a short note or memorandum
  5. the distance that can be travelled in a minuteit's only two minutes away
  6. up to the minute (up-to-the-minute when prenominal) very latest or newest
verb (tr)
  1. to record in minutesto minute a meeting
  2. to time in terms of minutes
See also minutes

Word Origin for minute

C14: from Old French from Medieval Latin minūta, n. use of Latin minūtus minute ²

minute

2
adjective
  1. very small; diminutive; tiny
  2. unimportant; petty
  3. precise or detaileda minute examination
Derived Formsminuteness, noun

Word Origin for minute

C15: from Latin minūtus, past participle of minuere to diminish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for minuter

minute

n.

"sixtieth part of an hour or degree," late 14c., from Old French minut (13c.) or directly from Medieval Latin minuta "minute, short note," from Latin minuta, noun use of fem. of minutus "small, minute" (see minute (adj.)). In Medieval Latin, pars minuta prima "first small part" was used by mathematician Ptolemy for one-sixtieth of a circle, later of an hour (next in order was secunda minuta, which became second (n.)). German Minute, Dutch minuut also are from French. Used vaguely for "short time" from late 14c. As a measure expressing distance (travel time) by 1886. Minute hand is attested from 1726.

minute

adj.

early 15c., "chopped small," from Latin minutus "little, small, minute," past participle of minuere "to lessen, diminish" (see minus). Meaning "very small in size or degree" is attested from 1620s. Related: Minutely; minuteness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

minuter in Science

minute

[mĭnĭt]
  1. A unit of time equal to 160 of an hour or 60 seconds.♦ A sidereal minute is 160 of a sidereal hour, and a mean solar minute is 160 of a mean solar hour. See more at sidereal time solar time.
  2. A unit of angular measurement, such as longitude or right ascension, that is equal to 160 of a degree or 60 seconds.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with minuter

minute

see at the last minute; every minute counts; just a minute; mile a minute; wait a minute.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.