misanthrope

[mis-uh n-throhp, miz-]
See more synonyms for misanthrope on Thesaurus.com
Also mis·an·thro·pist [mis-an-thruh-pist, miz‐] /mɪsˈæn θrə pɪst, mɪz‐/.

Origin of misanthrope

1555–65; noun use of Greek mīsánthrōpos hating humankind, misanthropic. See mis-2, anthropo-

Le Misanthrope

[French luh mee-zahn-trawp]
noun
  1. a comedy (1666) by Molière.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for misanthrope

doubter, egotist, skeptic, loner, egoist, misanthropist, recluse, cynic, hater, isolate

Examples from the Web for misanthrope

Contemporary Examples of misanthrope

Historical Examples of misanthrope

  • The misanthrope and the reckless are neither agitated nor agonised.

    Vivian Grey

    Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli

  • But how is it that you alone, Antisthenes, you misanthrope, love nobody?

  • He found comfort in the fact that Molire's Misanthrope was on his side.

  • And whether there were no means of inducing him to cease to be a Misanthrope?

    St. Ronan's Well

    Sir Walter Scott

  • Misanthrope is the potato: rough and repulsive outside, but good to the core.

    White Lies

    Charles Reade


British Dictionary definitions for misanthrope

misanthrope

misanthropist (mɪˈzænθrəpɪst)

noun
  1. a person who dislikes or distrusts other people or mankind in general
Derived Formsmisanthropic (ˌmɪzənˈθrɒpɪk) or misanthropical, adjectivemisanthropically, adverbmisanthropy (mɪˈzænθrəpɪ), noun

Word Origin for misanthrope

C17: from Greek mīsanthrōpos, from misos hatred + anthrōpos man
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for misanthrope
n.

"one who hates mankind," 1560s, from Greek misanthropos "hating mankind," from misein "to hate" (see miso-) + anthropos "man" (see anthropo-). Alternative form misanthropist is attested from 1650s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper