Advertisement

View synonyms for mold

mold

1

[ mohld ]

noun

  1. a hollow form or matrix for giving a particular shape to something in a molten or plastic state.
  2. the shape created or imparted to a thing by a mold.
  3. something formed in or on a mold:

    a mold of jelly.

  4. a frame on which something is formed or made.
  5. shape or form.
  6. a prototype, example, or precursor.
  7. a distinctive nature, character, or type:

    a person of a simple mold.

  8. Shipbuilding.
    1. a three-dimensional pattern used to shape a plate after it has been softened by heating.
    2. a template for a frame.
  9. Architecture.
    1. a group of moldings.


verb (used with object)

  1. to work into a required shape or form; shape.
  2. to shape or form in or on a mold.
  3. Metallurgy. to form a mold of or from, in order to make a casting.
  4. to produce by or as if by shaping material; form.
  5. to have influence in determining or forming:

    to mold the character of a child.

  6. to ornament with moldings.

mold

2

[ mohld ]

noun

  1. a growth of minute fungi forming on vegetable or animal matter, commonly as a downy or furry coating, and associated with decay or dampness.
  2. any of the fungi that produce such a growth.

verb (used with or without object)

  1. to become or cause to become overgrown or covered with mold.

mold

3

[ mohld ]

noun

  1. loose, friable earth, especially when rich in organic matter and favorable to the growth of plants.
  2. British Dialect. ground; earth.

mold

/ məʊld /

noun

  1. See mould
    the US spelling of mould 1


Discover More

Other Words From

  • molda·ble moulda·ble adjective
  • molda·bili·ty moulda·bili·ty noun

Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of mold1

First recorded in 1175–1225; Middle English noun molde, moulde “pattern, model, mold,” from Anglo-French molde, from Old French molle, modle, moule, from Latin modulus “standard unit (of measurement)”; the verb is derivative of the noun; mode

Origin of mold2

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English moulde, molde, apparently noun use of variant of earlier (i)mouled, moueld, past participle of moule(n), muhlen “to grow moldy, spoil, rot”; from Old Norse; compare Old Icelandic mygla, Swedish mögla, both meaning “to become moldy”

Origin of mold3

First recorded before 900; Middle English molde, moulde, mulde “dirt, loose earth, soil; earth or soil of a grave,” Old English molde “dust, sand, earth, the earth”; cognate with Gothic mulda “dust,” Old Icelandic mold “earth, mold,” Old High German molta “dust”; akin to meal 2, mill 1

Discover More

Idioms and Phrases

see cast in the same mold .

Discover More

Example Sentences

Then, the team used silicone molds of those items and plaster mixed with other materials to re-create the remaining 130 stones.

Two of the five, Newtowne 20 and Robinwood, are among the worst properties in the state, failing HUD inspections for violations that include structural damage, faulty plumbing and mold.

This silicone mold makes creating delicacies supereasy and delicious.

From Ozy

Thousands of slime mold amoebas cooperatively assemble into towers to spread their spores.

You could build bases on site by assembling pre-cast concrete pieces or making molds and pouring the concrete there.

Headmasters are in a unique position of power to mold the minds of impressionable young students.

One can think of a few American commentators who fit into that mold.

National Republicans see her in the mold of moderates like Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, but Democrats disagree.

On an issue like Syria, Cruz remains in the Kirkpatrick mold.

Square-jawed and muscular—in snapshots he looks like Channing Tatum in camo—Gibbs seemed to fit the mold of the ideal soldier.

Clubs were formed to discuss the great questions of the day, to mold public opinion, and to overawe the Assembly.

When he reached the woods along the creek he ran, keeping as much as possible on thick leaf mold that left the least impression.

The tire on its steel core is taken to the mold room and placed in a steel box or mold, shaped to exactly enclose it.

"Number two," said Balsamo, passing to the second mold, which he filled with the same skill and strength.

But the very next morning he turned up again, this time accompanied by another ranger of sterner mold.

Advertisement

Related Words

Word of the Day

axolotl

[ak-suh-lot-l ]

Meaning and examples

Start each day with the Word of the Day in your inbox!

By clicking "Sign Up", you are accepting Dictionary.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policies.

Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


molcajeteMoldau