monoplane

[mon-uh-pleyn]
noun
  1. an airplane with one main sustaining surface or one set of wings.
  2. Nautical. a planing craft the bottom of which is in an unbroken fore-and-aft line.

Origin of monoplane

First recorded in 1905–10; mono- + plane1
Related formsmon·o·plan·ist, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for monoplane

Historical Examples of monoplane

  • The total weight of the monoplane with engine and propeller is 352 pounds.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • Now the tendency in France seems to be to go back to the monoplane.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • The monoplane, a one-surfaced plane, like that used by Bleriot.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • Why we just dumped you into the monoplane here and then got aboard ourselves and off we went.

  • "You two stay here and guard this monoplane," exclaimed Jacques.


British Dictionary definitions for monoplane

monoplane

noun
  1. an aeroplane with only one pair of wingsCompare biplane
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for monoplane
n.

1907, a hybrid coined from mono- + second element of aeroplane. In old planes the wings formed a single surface running across the fuselage.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper