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View synonyms for plane

plane

1

[ pleyn ]

noun

  1. a flat or level surface.
  2. Geometry. a surface generated by a straight line moving at a constant velocity with respect to a fixed point.
  3. Fine Arts. an area of a two-dimensional surface having determinate extension and spatial direction or position:

    oblique plane; horizontal plane.

  4. a level of dignity, character, existence, development, or the like:

    a high moral plane.

    Synonyms: stage, stratum

  5. Aeronautics.
    1. an airplane or a hydroplane:

      to take a plane to Dallas.

    2. a thin, flat or curved, extended section of an airplane or a hydroplane, affording a supporting surface.
  6. Architecture. a longitudinal section through the axis of a column.


adjective

  1. flat or level, as a surface.

    Synonyms: flush, even, smooth

  2. of or relating to planes or plane figures.

verb (used without object)

, planed, plan·ing.
  1. to glide or soar.
  2. (of a boat) to rise partly out of the water when moving at high speed.
  3. Informal. to fly or travel in an airplane:

    We'll drive to Detroit and plane to Los Angeles.

plane

2

[ pleyn ]

noun

  1. Carpentry. any of various woodworking instruments for paring, truing, or smoothing, or for forming moldings, chamfers, rabbets, grooves, etc., by means of an inclined, adjustable blade moved along and against the piece being worked.
  2. a trowellike tool for smoothing the surface of clay in a brick mold.

verb (used with object)

, planed, plan·ing.
  1. to smooth or dress with or as if with a plane or a planer.
  2. to remove by or as if by means of a plane (usually followed by away or off ).

verb (used without object)

, planed, plan·ing.
  1. to work with a plane.
  2. to function as a plane.

plane

3

[ pleyn ]

plane

1

/ pleɪn /

noun

  1. maths a flat surface in which a straight line joining any two of its points lies entirely on that surface
  2. a flat or level surface
  3. a level of existence, performance, attainment, etc
    1. short for aeroplane
    2. a wing or supporting surface of an aircraft or hydroplane


adjective

  1. level or flat
  2. maths (of a curve, figure, etc) lying entirely in one plane

verb

  1. to fly without moving wings or using engines; glide
  2. (of a boat) to rise partly and skim over the water when moving at a certain speed
  3. to travel by aeroplane

plane

2

/ pleɪn /

noun

plane

3

/ pleɪn /

noun

  1. a tool with an adjustable sharpened steel blade set obliquely in a wooden or iron body, for levelling or smoothing timber surfaces, cutting mouldings or grooves, etc
  2. a flat tool, usually metal, for smoothing the surface of clay or plaster in a mould

verb

  1. to level, smooth, or cut (timber, wooden articles, etc) using a plane or similar tool
  2. often foll by off to remove using a plane

plane

/ plān /

Noun

  1. A two-dimensional surface, any two of whose points can be joined by a straight line that lies entirely in the surface.


Adjective

  1. Lying in a plane:

plane

  1. A geometrical location having only two dimensions — length and width (no height). ( See coordinates and plane geometry .)


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Derived Forms

  • ˈplaneness, noun
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Other Words From

  • planeness noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of plane1

First recorded in 1400–50 plane 1( fordef 9 ) (in the sense “to soar”); 1640–50 for noun and adjective senses; (noun) from Latin plānum “flat surface” (noun use of plānus “flat”); (adjective) from Latin plānus; first used to distinguish the geometrical senses formerly belonging to plain 1; plane 1( indef 5 ), shortened form of airplane, aeroplane, or hydroplane; (verb) late Middle English planen “(of a bird) to soar” (compare Middle French planer ); akin to plain 1

Origin of plane2

First recorded in 1375–1425; Middle English noun plane, plaine, pleine, from Middle French plan(n)e, Old French plaine, plane or directly from Late Latin plāna “plane, adze,” derivative of plānāre “to smooth,” itself derivative of Latin plānus plain 1; Middle English verb plane(n), plaine, pleine, from Middle French planer or directly from Late Latin plānāre

Origin of plane3

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English plane, plaine, from Middle French plane, Old French pleine, plane, from Latin platanus, from Greek plátanos, derivative of platýs “wide, broad, flat” (with reference to the leaves)
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Word History and Origins

Origin of plane1

C17: from Latin plānum level surface

Origin of plane2

C14: via Old French from Late Latin plāna plane, from plānāre to level
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Example Sentences

Pilots are well aware that fierce vortices form at the wingtips of accelerating planes and separate from there.

Wengfeng Lu is arrested before boarding a plane to China, where he planned to start a company copying medical-device technology he stole from two previous employers.

When operating, El Al’s planes have had to run a dogleg route to Mumbai, for example, down the Red Sea and up the Gulf of Aden to avoid Saudi airspace.

From Fortune

After five years cleaning planes at LAX, and never flying on one of them, I’d finally learned what my grandmother meant when she said that your job is temporary, and your education is forever.

From Fortune

One of the biggest impediments to self-flying planes is regulation, so the two founders tried to figure out how they could convince the FAA to approve unmanned flights without having to modify any existing regulations.

From Fortune

Chérif was arrested in Paris in January 2005 as he was about to board a plane to Damascus along with a man named Thamer Bouchnak.

As we waited for my plane to come in, we stayed silent for a long time.

And then I got on a plane, and guess what was playing: I Never Sang for My Father.

“Call me when the plane leaves the ground,” she said, in a tone that implied she knew her husband well.

On Monday, Soelistyo had jolted relatives as well as searchers by suggesting that the plane could be “at the bottom of the sea.”

The sequestered spot, a seat beneath a plane tree, with a lonesome arc-lamp shining full upon it, was occupied.

Hence the latter is not level, but has, in places, steps which have been worn to an inclined plane.

Therefore the families were strong, united, sound, resisting the storm like a line of plane trees!

Then he shaved this side of the block, then the other side, with a plane, a tool with a very sharp edge.

Here was another plane of existence where the machinations of men seemed to matter little.

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More About Plane

What does plane mean?

In geometry, a plane  is a flat, two-dimensional surface with an infinite height and width. It’s one of the basic concepts of geometry.

Think of a flat sheet of paper. A physical sheet of paper has three dimensions: length, width, and (a small) height. If that sheet of paper had zero height and its length and width extended forever, it would be a plane. Obviously, such a shape is theoretical—it’s used as a basis for geometric calculations.

A plane is one of several basic concepts students need to begin to understand geometry. Another is a point. Unlike a plane, it has no dimensions, such as length or width. It is found by using coordinates. A third concept is a line. Like a plane, a line also extends forever but only in two directions.

Understanding what a plane is matters because angles and two-dimensional shapes, such as squares, triangles, and circles, are represented as points, lines, and line segments on a plane. It also helps you understand three-dimensional space and three-dimensional objects, which have height as well as length and width. Plane has several other meanings, some of which have different roots. More generally, it can refer to any flat or level surface.

Why is plane important?

The first records of the word plane in a mathematical sense come from the early 1600s. It comes from the Latin plānum, meaning “flat surface,” which is a noun formed from the Latin adjective plānus, meaning “flat.”

Planes and many other basics of geometry are often credited to the Greek mathematician Euclid, who lived around the year 300 B.C. Euclid developed the idea of a plane, along with other fundamental concepts of geometry, such as points, lines, and two-dimensional shapes. All two-dimensional geometry exists on a plane. Because of this, geometry that deals with two-dimensional shapes is called plane geometry.

The other major type of geometry is solid geometry, which involves three-dimensional space and shapes, such as cubes and cylinders.

Did you know ... ?

Euclid’s conception of geometry, known as Euclidean geometry, provided almost the entire foundation of geometry for over 2,000 years until mathematicians explored non-Euclidean geometry in the 1800s.

What are real-life examples of plane?

We encounter planes all the time in everyday life, even though we might not use geometric terms to describe them.

 

 

What other words are related to plane?

Quiz yourself!

In geometry, a plane is a two-dimensional surface with:

A. infinite width and height.
B. infinite width and length.
C. infinite length and height.
D. infinite width, length, and height.

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Planck's radiation lawplane angle