moonflower

[moon-flou-er]

Origin of moonflower

First recorded in 1780–90; moon + flower
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for moonflower

Contemporary Examples of moonflower

  • The Moonflower Vineby Jetta Carleton A rediscovered gem reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird.

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    March 31, 2009

  • Jetta Carleton published one book in her life— The Moonflower Vine in 1963—and when she died in 1999, it was mostly forgotten.

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Historical Examples of moonflower

  • But the moonflower—he would like to have one more look at that.

    Harding's luck

    E. [Edith] Nesbit

  • The moonflower on the bookcase behind Alexander was a thing of beauty.

    The Lani People

    J. F. Bone

  • And her heart folded inward like the petals of a moonflower.

  • With Moonflower I have failed, although I soaked the big seed over night and sowed with great care.

    A Garden with House Attached

    Sarah Warner Brooks

  • The seeds of the Moonflower must be soaked in hot water, and left over night, before sowing.

    A Woman's Hardy Garden

    Helena Rutherfurd Ely


British Dictionary definitions for moonflower

moonflower

noun
  1. any of several night-blooming convolvulaceous plants, esp the white-flowered Calonyction (or Ipomoea) aculeatum
  2. Also called: angels' tears a Mexican solanaceous plant, Datura suaveolens, planted in the tropics for its white night-blooming flowers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012