mosstrooper

[ maws-troo-per, mos- ]
/ ˈmɔsˌtru pər, ˈmɒs- /

noun

a marauder who operated in the mosses, or bogs, of the border between England and Scotland in the 17th century.
any marauder.

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decorum

Origin of mosstrooper

First recorded in 1645–55; moss + trooper

OTHER WORDS FROM mosstrooper

moss·troop·er·y, nounmoss·troop·ing, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for mosstrooper

  • “If I had known you were such a mosstrooper you should have tasted longer of the Bass,” says he.

    Catriona|Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Yes; and the mosstrooper now lies in the Donjon with iron on wrist and ankle.

    The Mosstrooper|Robert Scott Fittis
  • “Ay; I had almost forgotten,” returned Sir James, as he went in search of the mosstrooper.

    The Mosstrooper|Robert Scott Fittis
  • "If I had known you were such a mosstrooper you should have tasted longer of the Bass," says he.

    David Balfour, Second Part|Robert Louis Stevenson

British Dictionary definitions for mosstrooper

mosstrooper
/ (ˈmɒsˌtruːpə) /

noun

a raider in the border country of England and Scotland in the mid-17th century

Word Origin for mosstrooper

C17 moss, in northern English dialect sense: bog
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012