noisy

[noi-zee]

adjective, nois·i·er, nois·i·est.

making much noise: noisy children.
abounding in or full of noise: a noisy assembly hall.
characterized by much noise: a noisy celebration; a noisy protest.

Origin of noisy

First recorded in 1685–95; noise + -y1
Related formsnois·i·ly, adverbnois·i·ness, nounun·nois·i·ly, adverbun·nois·y, adjective
Can be confusednoisome noisy

Synonyms for noisy

Antonyms for noisy

1. quiet.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for noisy

Contemporary Examples of noisy

Historical Examples of noisy

  • The effort to make them "disgorge" is as continual as it is noisy, and, as a rule, futile.

    'Tis Sixty Years Since

    Charles Francis Adams

  • Now I'm going on a tour of exploration and noisy admiration.

  • Never was I in such a noisy, roystering, singing, lounging place.

    The Roof of France

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • We hear of no more disturbances; the fact was that the audiences were too thin to be noisy.

    Handel

    Edward J. Dent

  • There was that noisy wind again, but this time it was gentler than it had been in the city.


British Dictionary definitions for noisy

noisy

adjective noisier or noisiest

making a loud or constant noise
full of or characterized by noise
Derived Formsnoisily, adverbnoisiness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for noisy
adj.

1690s, "making noise," also "full of noise," from noise + -y (2). Earlier was noiseful (late 14c.). Related: Noisily; noisiness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper