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non sequitur

[ non -sek-wi-ter, -toor; Latin nohn -se-kwi-toor ]
/ nɒn ˈsɛk wɪ tər, -ˌtʊər; Latin noʊn ˈsɛ kwɪˌtʊər /
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noun
Logic. an inference or a conclusion that does not follow from the premises.
a statement containing an illogical conclusion: The built environment has to be more presentable than it was in the past, but it's a non sequitur to claim that this must occur at the expense of cultural value.
something said or written that is unrelated to what immediately precedes: Your comment is at best a non sequitur, and bears zero relevance to the issue at point.
an illogical or unconnected shift from one thing to another: The Tibetan prints to the right of the formal portrait—with their religious figures and mandala-like patterns—initially seem like a non sequitur.
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Origin of non sequitur

First recorded in 1530–40; from Latin nōn sequitur “it does not follow”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use non sequitur in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for non sequitur

non sequitur
/ (ˈnɒn ˈsɛkwɪtə) /

noun
a statement having little or no relevance to what preceded it
logic a conclusion that does not follow from the premises
Abbreviation: non seq

Word Origin for non sequitur

Latin, literally: it does not follow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for non sequitur

non sequitur
[ (non sek-wuh-tuhr) ]

A thought that does not logically follow what has just been said: “We had been discussing plumbing, so her remark about astrology was a real non sequitur.” Non sequitur is Latin for “It does not follow.”

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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