notice

[ noh-tis ]
/ ˈnoʊ tɪs /

noun

verb (used with object), no·ticed, no·tic·ing.

Origin of notice

1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin nōtitia a knowing, a being known, derivative of nōtus known (see notify)

SYNONYMS FOR notice

10 note, mark, remark; descry, distinguish, discriminate, recognize, understand. Notice, discern, perceive imply becoming aware of, and paying attention to, something. To notice is to become aware of something that has caught one's attention: to notice a newspaper headline; to notice a road sign. Discern suggests distinguishing (sometimes with difficulty) and recognizing a thing for what it is, discriminating it from its surroundings: In spite of the fog, we finally discerned the outline of the harbor. Perceive, often used as a formal substitute for see or notice, may convey also the idea of understanding meanings and implications: After examining the evidence he perceived its significance.

Related forms

no·tic·er, nounre·no·tice, verb (used with object), re·no·ticed, re·no·tic·ing.un·no·ticed, adjectiveun·no·tic·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for notice

British Dictionary definitions for notice

notice

/ (ˈnəʊtɪs) /

noun

verb (tr)

Word Origin for notice

C15: via Old French from Latin notitia fame, from nōtus known, celebrated
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with notice

notice


see escape notice; give notice; short notice; sit up and take notice; take note (notice).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.