oblate

1
[ ob-leyt, o-bleyt ]
/ ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt /

adjective

flattened at the poles, as a spheroid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its shorter axis (opposed to prolate).

Origin of oblate

1
1695–1705; < New Latin oblātus lengthened, equivalent to Latin ob- ob- + (prō)lātus prolate
Related formsob·late·ly, adverb

Definition for oblate (2 of 2)

oblate

2
[ ob-leyt, o-bleyt ]
/ ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt /

noun

a person offered to the service of and living in a monastery, but not under monastic vows or full monastic rule.
a lay member of any of various Roman Catholic societies devoted to special religious work.

Origin of oblate

2
1860–65; < Medieval Latin oblātus, suppletive past participle of offerre to offer
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for oblate

British Dictionary definitions for oblate (1 of 2)

oblate

1
/ (ˈɒbleɪt) /

adjective

having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameterthe earth is an oblate sphere Compare prolate
Derived Formsoblately, adverb

Word Origin for oblate

C18: from New Latin oblātus lengthened, from Latin ob- towards + lātus, past participle of ferre to bring

British Dictionary definitions for oblate (2 of 2)

oblate

2
/ (ˈɒbleɪt) /

noun

a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life

Word Origin for oblate

C19: from French oblat, from Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin offerre to offer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012