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oblate

1
[ ob-leyt, o-bleyt ]
/ ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt /
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adjective

flattened at the poles, as a spheroid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its shorter axis (opposed to prolate).

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Origin of oblate

1
1695–1705; <New Latin oblātus lengthened, equivalent to Latin ob-ob- + (prō)lātusprolate

OTHER WORDS FROM oblate

ob·late·ly, adverb

Definition for oblate (2 of 2)

oblate2
[ ob-leyt, o-bleyt ]
/ ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt /

noun

a person offered to the service of and living in a monastery, but not under monastic vows or full monastic rule.
a lay member of any of various Roman Catholic societies devoted to special religious work.

Origin of oblate

2
1860–65; <Medieval Latin oblātus, suppletive past participle of offerre to offer
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for oblate

British Dictionary definitions for oblate (1 of 2)

oblate1
/ (ˈɒbleɪt) /

adjective

having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameterthe earth is an oblate sphere Compare prolate

Derived forms of oblate

oblately, adverb

Word Origin for oblate

C18: from New Latin oblātus lengthened, from Latin ob- towards + lātus, past participle of ferre to bring

British Dictionary definitions for oblate (2 of 2)

oblate2
/ (ˈɒbleɪt) /

noun

a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life

Word Origin for oblate

C19: from French oblat, from Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin offerre to offer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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