opus

[oh-puh s]

noun, plural o·pus·es or especially for 1, 2, o·pe·ra [oh-per-uh, op-er-uh] /ˈoʊ pər ə, ˈɒp ər ə/.

a musical composition.
one of the compositions of a composer, usually numbered according to the order of publication.
a literary work or composition, as a book: Have you read her latest opus? Abbreviation: op.

Origin of opus

1695–1705; < Latin: work, labor, a work

finis coronat opus

[fee-nis-koh-roh-naht-oh-poo s; English fin-is kaw-roh-nat oh-puh s, koh-]

Latin.

the end crowns the work.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for opus

Contemporary Examples of opus

Historical Examples of opus

  • It is perhaps only in the compositions subsequent to Opus 50 that Scriabine emerges in the fullness of his stature.

    Musical Portraits

    Paul Rosenfeld

  • It is, however, with the Opus Majus that Bacon's real activity begins.

  • A great deal of “opus consutum” has been done in the School of Art Needlework, in the way of restoration of old embroideries.

    Needlework As Art

    Marian Alford

  • He composed for this occasion a Grand Concerto (opus 15) in C major for piano and orchestra, taking the piano part himself.

    Beethoven

    George Alexander Fischer

  • There are nocturnes of Chopin's composed on a larger scale than the Opus 37, No. 2, but to my taste there is none more beautiful.

    The Pianolist

    Gustav Kobb



British Dictionary definitions for opus

opus

noun plural opuses or opera (ˈɒpərə)

an artistic composition, esp a musical work
(often capital) (usually followed by a number) a musical composition by a particular composer, generally catalogued in order of publicationBeethoven's opus 61 is his violin concerto
Abbreviation: op.

Word Origin for opus

C18: from Latin: a work; compare Sanskrit apas work
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for opus
n.

"a work, composition," especially a musical one, 1809, from Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion" (source of Italian opera, French oeuvre, Spanish obra), from PIE root *op- (Germanic *ob-) "to work, produce in abundance," originally of agriculture later extended to religious acts (cf. Sanskrit apas- "work, religious act;" Avestan hvapah- "good deed;" Old High German uoben "to start work, to practice, to honor;" German üben "to exercise, practice;" Dutch oefenen, Old Norse æfa, Danish øve "to exercise, practice;" Old English æfnan "to perform, work, do," afol "power"). The plural, seldom used as such, is opera.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper