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orange

[ awr-inj, or- ]
/ ˈɔr ɪndʒ, ˈɒr- /
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noun
adjective
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Origin of orange

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English: the fruit or tree, Old French orenge, cognate with Spanish naranja, from Arabic nāranj, from Persian nārang, from Sanskrit nāraṅga

Other definitions for orange (2 of 2)

Orange
[ awr-inj, or-; French aw-rahnzh for 3, 6 ]
/ ˈɔr ɪndʒ, ˈɒr-; French ɔˈrɑ̃ʒ for 3, 6 /

noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use orange in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for orange (1 of 3)

orange
/ (ˈɒrɪndʒ) /

noun
adjective
of the colour orange

Word Origin for orange

C14: via Old French from Old Provençal auranja, from Arabic nāranj, from Persian nārang, from Sanskrit nāranga, probably of Dravidian origin

British Dictionary definitions for orange (2 of 3)

Orange1

noun
(ˈɒrɪndʒ) a river in S Africa, rising in NE Lesotho and flowing generally west across the South African plateau to the Atlantic: the longest river in South Africa. Length: 2093 km (1300 miles)
(French ɔrɑ̃ʒ) a town in SE France: a small principality in the Middle Ages, the descendants of which formed the House of Orange. Pop: 27 989 (1999)Ancient name: Arausio (əˈraʊsɪəʊ)

British Dictionary definitions for orange (3 of 3)

Orange2
/ (ˈɒrɪndʒ) /

noun
a princely family of Europe. Its possessions, originally centred in S France, passed in 1544 to the count of Nassau, who became William I of Orange and helped to found the United Provinces of the Netherlands. Since 1815 it has been the name of the reigning house of the Netherlands. It was the ruling house of Great Britain and Ireland under William III and Mary (1689–94) and under William III as sole monarch (1694–1702)
(modifier) of or relating to the Orangemen
(modifier) of or relating to the royal dynasty of Orange
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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