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outgrow

[ out-groh ]

verb (used with object)

, out·grew, out·grown, out·grow·ing.
  1. to grow too large for:

    to outgrow one's clothes.

  2. to leave behind or lose in the changes incident to development or the passage of time:

    She outgrew her fear of the dark.

  3. to surpass in growing:

    watching one child outgrow another.



verb (used without object)

, out·grew, out·grown, out·grow·ing.
  1. Archaic. to grow out; burst forth; protrude.

outgrow

/ ˌaʊtˈɡrəʊ /

verb

  1. to grow too large for (clothes, shoes, etc)
  2. to lose (a habit, idea, reputation, etc) in the course of development or time
  3. to grow larger or faster than


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Word History and Origins

Origin of outgrow1

First recorded in 1585–95; out- + grow

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Example Sentences

In order to achieve these goals, and outgrow old habits, a new method of workplace communication becomes necessary.

From Digiday

Comic-Con again is often put in that category of outgrowing our waterfront facility.

“As a teenager, I recognized that I hadn’t outgrown it,” Pisarra said.

Two decades later, I’m pleased to say that I’ve outgrown such folly.

Rather, they feel more like a childhood friend I both love and have outgrown.

From Time

I would just say, musically, you just outgrow bands philosophically and politically.

I like that, with the way things are now in pop culture, you never really outgrow superheroes.

On some preconscious level, we never outgrow this expectation or fear about our omnipresent mothers.

And the insertion of technology into clothes raises a host of potential problems: what if you outgrow the shirt?

True, Jacob has to watch his temper so he doesn't hurt her when he shape-shifts into wolf form, but he'll soon outgrow that phase.

America did not outgrow this need, and this benefit, in the later days of Washington and Lincoln.

The top thus appears to outgrow the root, and such trees are apt to blow over during wind storms.

He belongs to a class who for practical purposes never outgrow mental childhood.

Could she be wrong in her belief that, given enough time, Larry would outgrow his infatuation for Maggie?

With the absence of all excitement, with entire rest of mind and body, the child would outgrow the evil.

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out-groupoutgrowth