pace

1
[ peys ]
/ peɪs /

noun

verb (used with object), paced, pac·ing.

verb (used without object), paced, pac·ing.

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Idioms for pace

    put through one's paces, to cause someone to demonstrate his or her ability or to show her or his skill: The French teacher put her pupils through their paces for the visitors.
    set the pace, to act as an example for others to equal or rival; be the most progressive or successful: an agency that sets the pace in advertising.

Origin of pace

1
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English pas, from Old French, from Latin passus “step, pace,” equivalent to pad-, variant stem of pandere “to spread (the legs, in walking)” + -tus suffix of verbal action, with dt becoming ss

synonym study for pace

15. Pace, plod, trudge refer to a steady and monotonous kind of walking. Pace suggests steady, measured steps as of one completely lost in thought or impelled by some distraction: to pace up and down. Plod implies a slow, heavy, laborious, weary walk: The mailman plods his weary way. Trudge implies a spiritless but usually steady and doggedly persistent walk: The farmer trudged to his village to buy his supplies.

Definition for pace (2 of 2)

pace2
[ pey-see, pah-chey; Latin pah-ke ]
/ ˈpeɪ si, ˈpɑ tʃeɪ; Latin ˈpɑ kɛ /

preposition

with all due respect to; with the permission of: I do not, pace my rival, hold with the ideas of the reactionists.

Origin of pace

2
1860–65; <Latin pāce in peace, by favor (ablative singular of pāxpeace, favor, pardon, grace)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for pace

British Dictionary definitions for pace (1 of 3)

pace1
/ (peɪs) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for pace

C13: via Old French from Latin passūs step, from pandere to spread, unfold, extend (the legs as in walking)

British Dictionary definitions for pace (2 of 3)

pace2
/ Latin (ˈpɑːkɛ, ˈpɑːtʃɛ, English ˈpeɪsɪ) /

preposition

with due deference to: used to acknowledge politely someone who disagrees with the speaker or writer

Word Origin for pace

C19: from Latin, from pāx peace

British Dictionary definitions for pace (3 of 3)

PACE
/ (peɪs) /

n acronym for (in England and Wales)

Police and Criminal Evidence Act
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with pace

pace

see change of pace; keep pace; put someone through his or her paces; set the pace; snail's pace.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.