paced

[ peyst ]
/ peɪst /

adjective

having a specified or indicated pace (usually used in combination): fast-paced.
counted out or measured by paces.
run at a pace set by a pacesetter.

Origin of paced

First recorded in 1575–85; pace1 + -ed3

Related forms

un·paced, adjective

Definition for paced (2 of 2)

pace

1
[ peys ]
/ peɪs /

noun

verb (used with object), paced, pac·ing.

verb (used without object), paced, pac·ing.

Origin of pace

1
1250–1300; Middle English pas < Old French < Latin passus step, pace, equivalent to pad-, variant stem of pandere to spread (the legs, in walking) + -tus suffix of v. action, with dt > ss

SYNONYMS FOR pace

8 step, amble, rack, trot, jog, canter, gallop, walk, run, singlefoot.
15 Pace, plod, trudge refer to a steady and monotonous kind of walking. Pace suggests steady, measured steps as of one completely lost in thought or impelled by some distraction: to pace up and down. Plod implies a slow, heavy, laborious, weary walk: The mailman plods his weary way. Trudge implies a spiritless but usually steady and doggedly persistent walk: The farmer trudged to his village to buy his supplies.

ANTONYMS FOR pace

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for paced

British Dictionary definitions for paced (1 of 3)

pace

1
/ (peɪs) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for pace

C13: via Old French from Latin passūs step, from pandere to spread, unfold, extend (the legs as in walking)

British Dictionary definitions for paced (2 of 3)

pace

2
/ Latin (ˈpɑːkɛ, ˈpɑːtʃɛ, English ˈpeɪsɪ) /

preposition

with due deference to: used to acknowledge politely someone who disagrees with the speaker or writer

Word Origin for pace

C19: from Latin, from pāx peace

British Dictionary definitions for paced (3 of 3)

PACE

/ (peɪs) /

n acronym for (in England and Wales)

Police and Criminal Evidence Act
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with paced

pace


see change of pace; keep pace; put someone through his or her paces; set the pace; snail's pace.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.