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pant

1
[ pant ]
/ pænt /
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See synonyms for: pant / panted / panting / pants on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object)
verb (used with object)
to breathe or utter gaspingly.
noun
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Origin of pant

1
First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English panten, from Middle French pant(a)is(i)er, from unattested Vulgar Latin phantasiāre “to have visions,” from Greek phantasioûn “to have or form images.” See fantasy

synonym study for pant

1. Pant, gasp suggest breathing with more effort than usual. Pant suggests rapid, convulsive breathing, as from violent exertion or excitement: to pant after running for the train. Gasp suggests catching one's breath in a single quick intake, as from amazement, terror, and the like, or a series of such quick intakes of breath, as in painful breathing: to gasp with horror; to gasp for breath.

OTHER WORDS FROM pant

pant·ing·ly, adverbun·pant·ing, adjective

Other definitions for pant (2 of 3)

pant2
[ pant ]
/ pænt /

adjective
of or relating to pants: pant cuffs.
noun

Origin of pant

2
First recorded in 1890–95; singular of pants

Other definitions for pant (3 of 3)

pant-

variant of panto- before a vowel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

WORDS THAT USE PANT-

What does pant- mean?

Pant- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “all.” It is occasionally used in a variety of scientific and technical terms.

Pant- comes from the Greek pâs, meaning “all.” The equivalent form derived from Latin is omni-, as in omnivore, which comes from Latin omnis, “all.”

What are variants of pan-?

Pant- is a variant of panto-, which loses its -o- when combined with words or word elements beginning with vowels. Another common variant of pant- is pan-, as in panhuman.

Want to know more? Read our Words That Use articles on pan- and panto-.

Examples of pant-

One example of a medical term that features the form pant- is pantalgia, “pain involving the entire body.”

The pant- part of the word means “all,” while the combining form -algia means “pain.” Pantalgia literally translates to “pain all over.”

What are some words that use the combining form pant-?

  • pantagogue
  • pantamorphic
  • pantarchy
  • pantatrophy
  • pantisocracy

What are some other forms that pant- may be commonly confused with?

Not every word that begins with the exact letters pant-, such as pantaloon, is necessarily using the combining form pant- to denote “all.” Learn what pantaloons are at our entry for the word.

Break it down!

Atrophy is a medical condition where parts of the body waste away. With this in mind, what kind of medical condition is pantatrophy?

How to use pant in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for pant

pant
/ (pænt) /

verb
to breathe with noisy deep gasps, as when out of breath from exertion or excitement
to say (something) while breathing thus
(intr often foll by for) to have a frantic desire (for); yearn
(intr) to pulsate; throb rapidly
noun
the act or an instance of panting
a short deep gasping noise; puff

Word Origin for pant

C15: from Old French pantaisier, from Greek phantasioun to have visions, from phantasia fantasy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for pant

pant
[ pănt ]

v.
To breathe rapidly and shallowly.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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