parallel

[par-uh-lel, -luhl]

adjective

noun

verb (used with object), par·al·leled, par·al·lel·ing or (especially British) par·al·lelled, par·al·lel·ling.


Origin of parallel

1540–50; < Latin parallēlus < Greek parállēlos side by side, equivalent to par- par- + állēlos one another; see allo-, else
Related formspar·al·lel·a·ble, adjectivepar·al·lel·less, adjectivepar·al·lel·ly, adverbnon·par·al·lel, adjective, nounsub·par·al·lel, adjectiveun·par·al·lel, adjective

Synonyms for parallel

Antonyms for parallel

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for paralleling

Historical Examples of paralleling

  • At this point Dick and Deuce, who had been paralleling through the woods, joined us.

    The Forest

    Stewart Edward White

  • There was nothing there, but on the sand, paralleling mine, were footprints.

    The Dope on Mars

    John Michael Sharkey

  • Her course, paralleling that taken by Holton, was about ten yards to the left of it.

    Otherwise Phyllis

    Meredith Nicholson

  • Paralleling this stream at the distance of about ten miles is the intense Merced.

    Your National Parks

    Enos A. Mills

  • They want straightening and paralleling, if we may so express it.


British Dictionary definitions for paralleling

paralleling

noun

a form of trading in which companies buy highly priced goods in a market in which the prices are low in order to be able to sell them in a market in which the prices are higher

parallel

adjective (when postpositive, usually foll by to)

separated by an equal distance at every point; never touching or intersectingparallel walls
corresponding; similarparallel situations
music
  1. Also: consecutive(of two or more parts or melodies) moving in similar motion but keeping the same interval apart throughoutparallel fifths
  2. denoting successive chords in which the individual notes move in parallel motion
grammar denoting syntactic constructions in which the constituents of one construction correspond to those of the other
computing operating on several items of information, instructions, etc, simultaneouslyCompare serial (def. 6)

noun

maths one of a set of parallel lines, planes, etc
an exact likeness
a comparison
Also called: parallel of latitude any of the imaginary lines around the earth parallel to the equator, designated by degrees of latitude ranging from 0° at the equator to 90° at the poles
  1. a configuration of two or more electrical components connected between two points in a circuit so that the same voltage is applied to each (esp in the phrase in parallel)
  2. (as modifier)a parallel circuit See series (def. 6)
printing the character (∥) used as a reference mark
a trench or line lying in advance of and parallel to other defensive positions

verb -lels, -leling or -leled (tr)

to make parallel
to supply a parallel to
to be a parallel to or correspond withyour experience parallels mine

Word Origin for parallel

C16: via French and Latin from Greek parallēlos alongside one another, from para- 1 + allēlos one another
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for paralleling

parallel

v.

1590s, from parallel (n.).

parallel

adj.

1540s, from Middle French parallèle (16c.) and directly from Latin parallelus, from Greek parallelos "parallel," from para allelois "beside one another," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + allelois "each other," from allos "other" (see alias). As a noun from 1550s. Parallel bars as gymnastics apparatus are recorded from 1868.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

paralleling in Science

parallel

[părə-lĕl′]

Adjective

Of or relating to lines or surfaces that are separated everywhere from each other by the same distance.

Noun

Any of the imaginary lines encircling the Earth's surface parallel to the plane of the equator, used to represent degrees of latitude. See illustration at longitude.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.