peeler

1
[pee-ler]
See more synonyms for peeler on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a person or thing that peels.
  2. a kitchen implement, often having a swiveling, protected blade, for removing the peel or outer skin of a vegetable or fruit.
  3. a long-staple cotton raised originally in the regions along the Yazoo River and the Mississippi River delta.
  4. a yarn made from this cotton.
  5. Slang. a striptease dancer.
  6. a log, especially of a Douglas fir, suitable for rotary cutting into veneers.

Origin of peeler

1
First recorded in 1325–75, peeler is from the Middle English word peler. See peel1, -er1

peeler

2
[pee-ler]
noun British Archaic.
  1. a police officer.

Origin of peeler

2
1810–20; named after Sir R. Peel; see -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for peeler

stripper, ecdysiast, peeler, stripteaser

Examples from the Web for peeler

Historical Examples of peeler

  • If a peeler was to take their names, they'd be shiverin' with fright.

    Changing Winds

    St. John G. Ervine

  • He knows old Peeler, the low miserable scoundrel, who is her father.

  • He sent a reporter on a secret mission to Peeler's house to find if she were there.

  • The editor was busy writing when Mr. Peeler entered the room furtively.

  • Peeler's eyes were fixed in a tense stare on a small bundle she carried.


British Dictionary definitions for peeler

peeler

1
noun
  1. a special knife or mechanical device for peeling vegetables, fruit, etca potato peeler
  2. US slang a striptease dancer

peeler

2
noun
  1. British old-fashioned, slang another word for policeman

Word Origin for peeler

C19: from the founder of the police force, Sir Robert Peel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for peeler
n.

"policeman," 1817, British colloquial, originally a member of the Irish constabulary, named for Sir (at that time Mr.) Robert Peel (1788-1850) who founded the Irish Constabulary (cf. bobby). In Middle English it meant "robber, thief" (mid-14c.). Meaning "strip-tease artist" (1951) is from peel (v.) in colloquial sense of "strip off clothing" (1820).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper