perk

1
[ purk ]
/ pɜrk /

verb (used without object)

to become lively, cheerful, or vigorous, as after depression or sickness (usually followed by up): The patients all perked up when we played the piano for them.
to act, or carry oneself, in a jaunty manner.
to put oneself forward briskly or presumptuously.

verb (used with object)

to make smart, trim, or jaunty (sometimes followed by up or out): to perk up a suit with a new white blouse.
to raise smartly or briskly (often followed by up or out): to perk one's head up.

adjective

perky; jaunty: a perk manner.

Origin of perk

1
1350–1400; Middle English perken; perhaps akin to peer2

OTHER WORDS FROM perk

perk·ing·ly, adverbperk·ish, adjective

Definition for perks (2 of 3)

perk2
[ purk ]
/ pɜrk /

verb (used with or without object) Informal.

to percolate: Has the coffee perked yet? The research team is perking with new ideas.

Origin of perk

2
1930–35, Americanism; by shortening and respelling of percolate

Definition for perks (3 of 3)

perk3
[ purk ]
/ pɜrk /

noun Informal.

Origin of perk

3
First recorded in 1815–25; by shortening and respelling
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for perks

British Dictionary definitions for perks (1 of 3)

perk1
/ (pɜːk) /

adjective

pert; brisk; lively

verb

Word Origin for perk

C16: see perk up

British Dictionary definitions for perks (2 of 3)

perk2
/ (pɜːk) /

verb informal

(intr) (of coffee) to percolate
(tr) to percolate (coffee)

British Dictionary definitions for perks (3 of 3)

perk3
/ (pɜːk) /

noun

British informal short for perquisite
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012